When Can I Fly After Retinal Detachment Surgery?

The answer in short is yes, in almost all cases.

Eye conditions which preclude safe air travel are rare.

However, if you have a recent onset of light flashes and/or new floaters, have your eyes examined prior to travel to rule out a retinal tear or detachment, especially if you are traveling to a remote location.

How long after retinal detachment surgery can I fly?

This process often takes between one week and a month, depending on each gas, and its evolution should be assessed by your ophthalmologist. There is no problem in flying once the air bubble has completely disappeared from the ocular cavity.

Can you fly with a retinal detachment?

Importantly, you will be instructed not to fly in an airplane or travel to high altitudes until your ophthalmologist determines that the gas bubble is gone. Flying or traveling to high altitudes can cause pressure build-up within the eye and permanent loss of vision.

Can you fly after a vitrectomy?

If you had a gas bubble placed in your eye during your vitrectomy, you will need to follow specific instructions about positioning after the surgery. To avoid complications, you will also need to avoid air travel for a period after the procedure. Ask your eye doctor when it will be safe for you to fly again.

How long does it take to clear vision after vitrectomy?

You might have some pain in your eye and your vision may be blurry for a few days after the surgery. You will need 2 to 4 weeks to recover before you can do your normal activities again. It may take longer for your vision to get back to normal.

Can I fly after detached retina surgery?

The answer in short is yes, in almost all cases. Eye conditions which preclude safe air travel are rare. However, if you have a recent onset of light flashes and/or new floaters, have your eyes examined prior to travel to rule out a retinal tear or detachment, especially if you are traveling to a remote location.

What is the success rate of retinal detachment surgery?

RESULTS: Initial success rate for retinal reattachment was 86% for scleral buckling only, 90% for vitrectomy only, 94% for the combination of scleral buckling and vitrectomy, and 63% for pneumatic retinopexy surgery.

Can you go blind from a detached retina?

A detached retina occurs when the retina is pulled away from its normal position in the back of the eye. The retina sends visual images to the brain through the optic nerve. When detachment occurs, vision is blurred. A detached retina is a serious problem that can cause blindness unless it is treated.

How quickly does retinal detachment progress?

Most retinal detachments progress to total retinal detachments and complete loss of vision. If the retina is not re-attached promptly (usually less than a week after macular detachment), then visual recovery is progressively affected.

How long does it take to get vision back after retinal detachment surgery?

Approximately 40 percent of patients with successfully repaired retinal detachments achieve excellent vision within six months after surgery.

How long does it take for gas bubble to go away after retina surgery?

The longevity of the gas bubble varies among patients but is typically about 3 to 5 days for air, 2 to 3 weeks for SF6, and approximately 6 to 8 weeks for C3F8. Optimizing the gas fill in eyes undergoing vitreous surgery requires a complete vitrectomy.

What is the next step after removing oil from eye?

The Correct CPT Code

Silicone oil is injected into the eye following the vitrectomy and left in the eye until the surgeon determines the retina is stable. The two most common codes used for removal of oil, without treatment of other pathology, are 67036 and 67121.

How do you lay your face down after eye surgery?

The four common postoperative surgical positions are:

  • Upright. Keep your head upright. Do not lay on either side or look up.
  • Face down. Look down towards the floor.
  • Left side down. Position your head with your left ear tilted towards to floor.
  • Right side down. Position your head with your right ear tilted towards to floor.