Can You Have Lasik Surgery Twice?

LASIK is a permanent surgical procedure that alters the shape of your cornea to help you see more clearly.

In some cases, you may need a secondary, or enhancement surgery, after an initial LASIK procedure.

In general, there is no limit on how many LASIK procedures you can get in your lifetime.

Can you have Lasik done more than once?

However, due to the natural aging process of the eye the effects of this permanent procedure may change, and even reduce, over time. Which begs the question: is it possible to have laser eye surgery more than once? In short, the answer is yes, but it’s not quite that simple.

How often does Lasik need to be redone?

With modern LASIK, the enhancement rate is 1-2 percent in the first 12 months and then about 1 percent a year after that as patients’ eyes can change with time. So, for example, 10 years after LASIK, approximately 10 percent of patients may require an enhancement procedure to maintain their excellent vision.

Can Lasik surgery be redone?

In most cases the improved vision LASIK surgery provides is permanent. But in a limited number of cases — usually due to changes that can occur in the lens inside the eye, with or without LASIK surgery — some nearsightedness, farsightedness and/or astigmatism can return over time, causing blurry vision.

How many Lasik enhancements can be done?

The Bottom Line on LASIK Enhancements

The majority of LASIK patients achieve their vision goals with LASIK: 90 percent get to 20/20 or better vision after the procedure. So, the likelihood you will want a LASIK enhancement is pretty small.

Will I need glasses after Lasik?

Since LASIK surgery is typically performed to correct distance vision and refractive errors rather than issues stemming from presbyopia, whether or not you will need reading glasses after LASIK depends on your age. So if you wear reading glasses, you should keep them on hand after your LASIK procedure.

How much does Lasik Really Cost?

While charges for LASIK procedures vary widely by practice and region, the average cost of LASIK is between $1,500 to $3,000 per eye depending on the type of the procedure, surgeon and region of the country.

Can I get Lasik surgery twice?

LASIK is a permanent surgical procedure that alters the shape of your cornea to help you see more clearly. In some cases, you may need a secondary, or enhancement surgery, after an initial LASIK procedure. In general, there is no limit on how many LASIK procedures you can get in your lifetime.

What are the disadvantages of laser eye surgery?

Risks of LASIK include:

  • Dry eyes. LASIK surgery causes a temporary decrease in tear production.
  • Glare, halos and double vision. After surgery you may have difficulty seeing at night.
  • Undercorrections.
  • Overcorrections.
  • Astigmatism.
  • Flap problems.
  • Vision loss or changes.

How many years does Lasik last?

Long-Lasting Results

Prospective patients often ask me, “after successful LASIK, how long will the results last?” The answer for most people is years or even decades. However, there are some exceptions to the rule. Approximately 5 percent of patients develop small changes in their eyes that require a second procedure.

How long does it take to get 20/20 vision after Lasik?

Answer: While many patients see 20/20 on the next day after LASIK, it is also common for many patients to require additional time (days or weeks or even months) before the best vision is achieved. Studies show that vision continues to improve following LASIK vision correction for up to a year after the procedure.

Does cornea grow back after Lasik?

In LASIK, a thin flap is created on the cornea with a microkeratome or a femtosecond laser. This flap is lifted to expose the underlying corneal tissue and is replaced after the cornea is reshaped with an excimer laser. The epithelium repairs itself (grows back over the corneal surface) within a few days after surgery.

Is it safe to have PRK after Lasik?

In most cases, as it is the safest option

Because the flap contributes minimally to the mechanical integrity of the post-LASIK cornea, a PRK approach is safer in my view. The risk of haze, which is notoriously a drawback of the surface re-treatment approach, appears to be higher if PRK is performed soon after LASIK.