Quick Answer: Can Vitreous Detachment Heal Itself?

Usually the fibers break, allowing the vitreous to separate and shrink from the retina.

This is a vitreous detachment.

In most cases, a vitreous detachment, also known as a posterior vitreous detachment, is not sight-threatening and requires no treatment.

How long do symptoms of vitreous detachment last?

You may find that your symptoms only last a few weeks, but it’s more common for them to last about six months. The floaters and flashes of light which affect people with PVD will gradually calm down over time.

What causes a vitreous detachment?

Posterior vitreous detachment. Posterior vitreous detachment (PVD) is a very common eye condition. It’s caused by natural changes to the vitreous gel which takes up the space inside the eye. Although PVD causes some frustrating symptoms it doesn’t cause pain, harm the eye or cause permanent loss of vision.

Is vitreous detachment the same as retinal detachment?

Posterior vitreous detachment (PVD): As the vitreous liquefies, it also shrinks and pulls away from the retina. This process is called a posterior vitreous detachment, or PVD. Many people develop posterior vitreous detachments and never experience symptoms, whereas others may notice new floaters.

Can vitreous detachment cause headaches?

Retinal tears, retinal detachment, infection, inflammation, hemorrhage, or a head injury may also cause floaters and flashes. Occasionally, flashes of light are caused by neurological problems such as a migraine headache and can cause certain type of flashes of light.

What is the treatment for vitreous detachment?

No specific treatment is needed for PVD. That said, complications of PVD are rare but can be serious and require urgent treatment, such as laser for a retinal tear or surgery for a retinal detachment. For this reason, one or more checkups are recommended within 3 months after the onset of PVD.

Is vitreous detachment an emergency?

Usually the fibers break, allowing the vitreous to separate and shrink from the retina. This is a vitreous detachment. In most cases, a vitreous detachment, also known as a posterior vitreous detachment, is not sight-threatening and requires no treatment.

What can I do for vitreous detachment?

If you still have floaters after a few months, your doctor may give you the option to use a laser to reduce the floater or have surgery to take out the vitreous gel and clear the floaters. If you have a retina tear, laser surgery or cryopexy, which freezes the tear, can repair it.

Can you exercise with posterior vitreous detachment?

Some ophthalmologists will advise that strenuous exercise should be avoided during the first six weeks after the start of a PVD. This is because your vitreous may not have completely detached from your retina and you may be at greater risk of having a retinal detachment.

What are the warning signs of a detached retina?

But warning signs almost always appear before it occurs or has advanced, such as:

  • The sudden appearance of many floaters — tiny specks that seem to drift through your field of vision.
  • Flashes of light in one or both eyes (photopsia)
  • Blurred vision.
  • Gradually reduced side (peripheral) vision.